Powered by The Ohio State University

News & Research

Alcohol and Marijuana Co-Use: Consequences, Subjective Intoxication, and the Operationalization of Simultaneous Use

Simultaneous alcohol and marijuana use (SAM) has become common throughout college campuses across the nation. Previous research has shown co-use of these substances puts users at higher risk for adverse outcomes. This study completes a 28-day measurement to examine whether daily co-use versus alcohol and marijuana use alone can predict consequences and investigate differences in SAM and concurrent use (CAM).

Students were recruited (341) from three state universities that each had different recreational marijuana use laws. For the first it was illegal and criminalized, the second it was illegal but decriminalized, and the third it was legal for those 21+. Procedures included a baseline survey and then 28 days of data collection with 5 daily surveys. Measures included subjective intoxication, substance consumption, substance use consequences, co-use, CAM and SAM, and covariates. SAM was designated as use of marijuana and alcohol together within 37 minutes while CAM was designated as use of marijuana and alcohol together not within 37 minutes. Consequences included hangover, nausea/vomiting, hut self, drove car drunk/high, blackout, rude/aggressive, unwanted sex.

Results showed daily co-use indicated an increase in consequences compared to marijuana-only days. Co-use also increased subjective intoxication and the relationship between number of drinks and this intoxication was weaker than on alcohol-only days. Researchers found that number of drinks predicted increased consequences and there were no differences between consequences for SAM or CAM days. Overall, timing of daily co-use within 1-240 minutes had no difference in consequences or subjective intoxication. These findings are important to understand increased risks for young adults using more than one substance simultaneously regardless of the time interval.

Take Away: This study completes two 28-day measurement waves to examine whether daily co-use versus using alcohol and marijuana alone can predict consequences along with seeing if there are difference in Simultaneous alcohol and marijuana use (SAM) and concurrent use (CAM). Students were recruited (341) from three state universities with varying laws on recreational marijuana. Measures included subjective intoxication, substance consumption, substance use consequences, co-use, CAM and SAM, and covariates. Results showed that co-use increased consequences when compared to single substance use along with also increasing subjective intoxication. Overall, timing of daily co-use within 1-240 minutes had no difference in consequences or subjective intoxication. These findings are important to understand increased risks for young adults using more than one substance simultaneously regardless of the time interval.

Tags: Alcohol, Marijuana, College

Sokolovsky, A. W., Gunn, R. L., Micalizzi, L., White, H. R., & Jackson, K. M. (2020). Alcohol and marijuana co-use: Consequences, subjective intoxication, and the operationalization of simultaneous use. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 212, 107986. doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2020.107986

Leave a Reply

avatar
  Subscribe  
Notify of

Our Founding Partners