Powered by The Ohio State University

Recorded Sessions

The 2021 Virtual National Meeting offers a wide range of pre-recorded sessions for participants to view and engage with at their own pace. All recorded sessions offered as part of the 2021 Virtual National Meeting will be available for viewing beginning on July 26, 2021. Topics include AOD prevention, hazing, cannabis, collective trauma, stimulant misuse, intersections between AOD and racial justice, and much more.

Access to all pre-recorded sessions is available through the 2021 Virtual National Meeting Scarlet Canvas Course.

Recorded Sessions

Headshot of Becki Elkins, PhD
Becki Elkins, PhD
Headshot of Ting Wang, M.S.Ed
Ting Wang, M.S.Ed

Does “Sober” Mean “White”? Collegiate Recovery, Racial Justice, and Decolonization

Becki Elkins, PhD & Ting Wang, M.S.Ed

 

Limited numbers of colleges have programs supporting students in recovery from substance use disorders. Representation in collegiate recovery programs tends to be overwhelmingly white, highlighting racial disparity in access to and use of such programs. ACPA’s Strategic Imperative for Racial Justice and Decolonization offers a tool for grounding our work with students in critical consciousness, radical democracy, and humanization in ways that allow us to confront the privilege and oppression often found in recovery. Join us in exploring how to challenge racism and white supremacy in collegiate recovery to better support BIPOC students in recovery.

Bridging Prevention and Recovery in Systems of Higher Education

Brandee Izquierdo, MPA, Sarah Potter, MPA, Donna George, MS

 

With overdose rates being fueled by the COVID-19 pandemic, both communities and institutions of higher education must identify ways to better support and serve students during this unprecedented time.

While most schools typically approach this with a wellness and prevention lens, recovery professionals can also contribute significant experience and knowledge in the areas of trauma, mental health, and social isolation. By using a more integrated and collaborative approach like SAFE Project’s Bridging Prevention and Recovery model, schools can benefit from both contributions and ultimately enhance their efforts to maximize impact.

Headshot of Brandee Izquierdo, MPA
Brandee Izquierdo, MPA
Headshot of Sarah Potter, MPA
Sarah Potter, MPA
Headshot of Donna George, MS
Donna George, MS

Supporting Student Success by Bolstering Internal Motivations

Brenda Young, MPH, Emma Celoza, MS, Jessica Keene

 

Higher education institutions have seen a growing trend of students who are experiencing varying levels of emotional distress that could influence their decisions related to use of substances. Come learn how one institution has equipped student facing faculty, staff and student leaders with the tools needed to identify signs of emotional distress and enhance their ability to communicate with students in efforts to connect them with appropriate services.

Headshot of Brenda Young, MPHg
Brenda Young, MPH
Headshot of Emma Celoza, MS
Emma Celoza, MS
Headshot of Jessica Keene
Jessica Keene
Headshot of Carl Reisch
Carl Reisch
Headshot of Jill Maurer
Jill Maurer

Hazing Prevention & Intervention 101

Carl Reisch & Jill Maurer

 

This session will discuss the three components of hazing, while recognizing that hazing exists on a continuum. Consent, the concept of hidden harm, and the relationships between alcohol and hazing will be discussed in an effort to increase motivation among campus professionals to educate and intervene on their campus.

Headshot of Dane Minnick, PhD, LSW, CPS, BCPG
Dane Minnick, PhD, LSW, CPS, BCPG

Creating a Community-Academic Partnership to Address Addictions and Substance Misuse on College Campuses and in Local Communities

Dane Minnick, PhD, LSW, CPS, BCPG

 

This session provides a blueprint for how to successfully create a large, university-based coalition capable of effectively leveraging community, university, faculty, and student resources to develop and enhance substance use prevention, treatment, harm-reduction, and recovery services on college campuses and in local communities.

Headshot of Holly Deering, M.Ed.
Holly Deering, M.Ed.
Headshot of Jill Maurer
Jill Maurer

Preventing Alcohol Overdose: An Integrated Campaign to Save Lives

Holly Deering, M.Ed. & Jill Maurer

 

The Gordie Center at the University of Virginia works to end hazing and alcohol misuse among high school and college students nationally. Many students are unsure of the signs of an alcohol overdose and at what point they should call 911 for help. Working with students and experts, the Gordie Center created a simple acronym for individuals to identify and remember the signs of alcohol overdose, PUBS.

This session will discuss prevention guiding principles and showcase a campaign that is research-based, and includes a comprehensive and coordinated approach. Learn how the University of Virginia employs an integrated campaign around PUBS, how students respond, and the research that indicates its effectiveness.

Headshot of Joshua Hersh, MD
Joshua Hersh, MD

Using the SAFE Toolkit to Decrease Prescription Stimulant Misuse

Joshua Hersh, MD

 

While research has looked at the scope of the problem of prescription stimulant abuse on college campuses, there is not much research that looks at specific treatment models for focus problems/ADHD that can be used at universities to decrease prescription stimulant abuse and misuse. This presentation will describe a stepped care model called the SAFE method (Stepped Care Approach to Focus Evaluation). The SAFE method involves online interactive student courses that students are required to complete before being tested for ADHD and/or given prescription stimulants. This approach is currently being studied and preliminary evidence will be presented.

Headshot of Dr. Ramona Palmerio-Roberts
Dr. Ramona Palmerio-Roberts

Understanding and Addressing Collective Trauma Among College Students and Campus Communities

Dr. Ramona Palmerio-Roberts

 

While research has looked at the scope of the problem of prescription stimulant abuse on college campuses, there is not much research that looks at specific treatment models for focus problems/ADHD that can be used at universities to decrease prescription stimulant abuse and misuse. This presentation will describe a stepped care model called the SAFE method (Stepped Care Approach to Focus Evaluation). The SAFE method involves online interactive student courses that students are required to complete before being tested for ADHD and/or given prescription stimulants. This approach is currently being studied and preliminary evidence will be presented.

Headshot of Rick Shaw
Rick Shaw

The First Preventers Playbook: Creating a Culture of Prevention for the Whole Community

Rick Shaw

 

A Culture of Prevention involves harnessing the power of First Preventers and using disruptive solutions to disrupt status quo processes and disrupt community problems using the 6 Stages of Prevention. These strategies will show you how to equip your teams to eliminate soaring liabilities, lawsuits, and costly long-term consequences that could lead to more incidents and tragedies. This session will explain these steps to attendees so they can start creating a Culture of Prevention and a First Preventers program within their own organizations, campuses, and communities.

Headshot of Sam Martinez, MPH
Sam Martinez, MPH
Headshot of Yasmeen Pardo
Yasmeen Pardo

Building, Implementing, and Evaluating an Engaging Spring Wellness Series for College Students Using Instagram Live

Sam Martinez, MPH, CHES & Yasmeen Pardo

 

This session will share insight into creating and implementing a wellness series for university students using Instagram. The wellness series was implemented during the spring 2021 semester while most students remained in a virtual learning environment and included a variety of topics ranging across the 8 dimensions of well-being. Participants will receive the best practices identified through the heath education challenges presented during the 2020-2021 academic year. Strategies related to promotion via social media platforms, collaboration with various campus departments and community stakeholders, and assessment techniques will all be included in this session.

Headshot of Susie Bruce, M.Ed.
Susie Bruce, M.Ed.
Headshot of Holly Deering, M.Ed.
Holly Deering, M.Ed.

Alcohol, Cannabis, and Athletic Team Success: The “Hook” for Student-Athletes

Susie Bruce, M.Ed. & Holly Deering, M.Ed.

 

Understanding the unique needs of and demands on student-athletes is critical to providing tailored prevention information. Although student-athletes are more likely than non-athletes to experience harm related to alcohol use, many student-athletes are unaware that alcohol and cannabis can negatively impact athletic performance. This interactive presentation reviews the performance impacts of alcohol and cannabis use. The latest NCAA research on student-athlete substance use norms and considerations for adapting social norms-based interventions will be addressed. The presentation will use audience engagement strategies that are more easily accessed if participants have a 2nd internet-enabled device (iPad, Smartphone, etc.)

Headshot of Joan Masters
Joan Masters

The Why Behind the How: Implementing Evidence-Based Strategies and Using the Public Health Approach

Joan Masters

 

This Prevention 101 session will cover the core phases of SAMHSA’s Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) a process to help understand the WHY behind the HOW of prevention. An introduction to the Public Health Approach and the Socio-Ecological Framework will also be shared. Designed for emerging professionals, those new to the field, or for those who need a refresher or introduction on the basics of behavioral data-driven decision making, this session will break down and explain the importance of each of the five phases of the Strategic Prevention Framework and how it relates to the work of prevention on campus. Participants will learn about the key tools public health professionals should use in their daily strategic practice.

Pivoting Through the Pandemic

Joan Masters, Margo Lietschuh, Dong Ding, & Molly Lidner

 

2020 was a year of constant change and the schools represented by the Missouri Partners in Prevention coalition, have been forced to pivot in many ways well into 2021. As we move out of this unique time, what changes have we made that should stay? What is next for telling the story of prevention? During this interactive session, campus and statewide examples will be provided, including how campuses coped and what issues and strategies may be here to stay post-pandemic.

Headshot of Joan Masters
Joan Masters
Headshot of Margo Lietschuh
Margo Lietschuh
Headshot of Dong Ding
Dong Ding
Headshot of Molly Lidner
Molly Lidner
Headshot of Margo Lietschuh
Margo Lietschuh
Headshot of Kayleigh Greenwood
Kayleigh Greenwood

The Social Determinants of Health and Student Well-Being

Margo Lietschuh & Kayleigh Greenwood

 

The social determinants of health (SDOH) are conditions in the places where people live, learn, work, and play, that impact a wide range of health risks and outcomes. Understanding the social determinants of health is key to helping improve students’ well-being. Join Missouri Partners in Prevention for a discussion on data related to the SDOH, their impact on student well-being, and the connection between the SDOH, justice, and equity.

Headshot of M. Dolores Cimini, PhD
M. Dolores Cimini, PhD

Building a Comprehensive , Sustainable Campus Peer Education Program: Lessons from a Program that has Thrived for 50 Years

M. Dolores Cimini, PhD

 

The proposed workshop focuses on the development, implementation, evaluation, and lessons learned from a university-based peer education organization which has been active for fifty years and which has operated one of the first hotline services and progressive peer education programs of its kind in the United States. This evidence-based peer education program, which has built linkages to student affairs, academic affairs, and student government to support its operations and has been named as a national model by the U.S. Department of Education and the Substance Abuse and
Mental Health Services Administration, represents a strong bridge between science and practice as well as a key link to effective, low-cost, comprehensive prevention.

Headshot of Dong Ding
Dong Ding
Headshot of Margo Lietschuh
Margo Lietschuh

Students’ Substance Use and Health Under the Influence of COVID-19

Dong Ding & Margo Lietschuh

 

COVID-19 has affected Missouri campuses in unprecedented ways. As sheltering in place, virtual learning, and social distancing became the new normal, we considered the unprecedented impact on students’ health and well-being, especially related to stress and mental health, and substance misuse. While we are all certainly concerned about protecting students from the transmission of COVID-19, it is now more important than ever to remain committed to our mission to address concerns related to well-being and substance misuse.

Our Founding Partners